college life

Colleges and the smartphone wave

Sure, there may be students among the 15,000-plus undergraduates at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, who don’t carry a smartphone. But “I haven’t seen them,” says campus telecommunications director Tom Walsh.

Indeed, smartphones have insinuated themselves into campus life in a relatively short time. Some 93% of college students had one last spring, says market-research company Student Monitor, based on a survey of 1,200 four-year full-time students on 100 college and university campuses. Three years earlier that number was 84%.

That’s light-years away from his day, Walsh says, when a pay phone at each end of the residence hall was the link to the outside world.

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Wired competition

Wired competition

Dan Reed, IT chief at the Univerity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, says focus on technology prepares students for a wired world. “You have to keep up with the Joneses,” he says. “Students expect high-speed internet and high-bandwidth information, and if you can’t deliver it, you’re at a competitive disadvantage.”

Gazing intently at his laptop in the student union’s basement, Varkey was making the most of UNC’s wireless Web access one day this month: firing off instant messages, reviewing an anatomy assignment and checking his bank balance.

Just nine miles down Highway 15/501 in Durham, Duke University had been feeling a bit of a technology inferiority complex some years ago. So about a decade ago, it seized national headlines by spending $500,000 to give each of its 1,650 incoming freshmen a free Apple iPod digital music player.

Some Duke students were using the popular iPods to practice foreign language dialects, record scripts for theater classes or analyze music in engineering labs, and professors have been encouraged to tape lectures and post them online.

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Gadgets rule on college campuses

From Beginning to End, Technology Revolutionizes the College Experience

Today’s college students lug onto campus just as much technology as footlockers, luggage, boxes, and books. Not only do most students have laptops or PCs, but practically all carry smartphones with Internet access, instant messaging, and film and picture-taking functions.

Then, there are those with iPods, MP3 players and a gaggle of other gadgets that keep them occupied nearly 24/7 — as the slang goes. Staying connected is a cinch for students whether they are in the dorm, library, classroom, coffee shop or sprawled on the campus green.

Most university and college campuses are able to keep up. The Campus Computing Project, which has studied the role of computing and information technology in American higher education since 1990, found 75.2% of college courses with a web page in 2014, compared with only 34.2% in 2001; also, use of e-mail in college courses tripled again between 2004 and 2016 (30.1% vs. 91.1%) as did the number of college courses using Internet-based resources, such as listing URLs in a course syllabus (37,4% in 2001 vs. 87.4% in 2001).

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Do colleges look down on half days in your senior year?

Short answer

Yes.

Long answer:

As I mentioned earlier, colleges primarily look at your junior year academics when making a decision about you. But that doesn’t make your senior year unimportant at all.

Let’s put it this way. Say you’re an employer trying to decide who to hire. You look at one person’s application and see that he was a great worker at his current job, but you find out that once he had the prospect of being hired by you, he stopped working as hard and kind of turned a blind eye to things. The other person kept on working strong, even with a decent chance of being hired by you. Who would you hire?
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WordPress Upgrade and Xmas Food

I finally upgraded my WordPress and so far I’m loving it. The new dashboard design is very useful as most things are but one click away. I really hate having to go to two other pages to find what it is I want! Aside from this brief examination I have not explored much else, yet.

Christmas

Christmas is only four days away! How insane is that? This year has gone so fast for me and I keep thinking about how it seems like only six months ago we celebrated Christmas. I have been wishing for that childhood state where time just goes on and on and nothing seems to fly by you.

Anyway, this year is my first Christmas being properly vegan, so I am having to plan a bit better what I will actually be eating. Side dishes are usually fine as there are plenty of salads, vegetables (the joys of a Summer Christmas are easy BBQs and lots of salad), breads, etc. made without animal ingredients. However, main dishes are a little different, obviously, because I wont be stuffing myself with any meat.

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Applying for Student Auto Loans

Living away from home for the first time in your life may be fun but it isn’t easy, especially if you don’t have your own car. Fortunately, several student auto loan options are available. Purchasing your first car with your own money may be one of the highlights of your teenage life; however, you need to consider a number of factors when you’re choosing a student auto loan.


Benefits of Obtaining Student Auto Loans

Commuting from your place to university daily can get tiring, especially if you’re usually up all night studying (or partying!). Since most university students don’t have extra cash lying around to purchase a car, student auto loans come in handy. If you’re still on the fence trying to decide whether or not you should apply for student auto loans, here are a couple of points to consider:
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Becoming A Physical Therapist Online Has Never Been Easier

Unlike previously when it was mandatory to physically attend classes at a campus for you to graduate as a physical therapist, you now can study for your degree from the comfort of your home. There are a few things you should keep in mind before you undertake an online course.

The first thing you should do is research all the schools that give you the option to study online. You should check that these are reputable schools that have accreditation, whether regionally or nationally. Once you have a list of the schools, you should compare and contrast their fee structures. Some schools will be more expensive than others. Doing this will help you select the one that is more suited to your budget.

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Do I need a laptop lock? How to protect your laptop in college

One of the unfortunate truths about college is that theft can still occur there. Your car can be broken into, and your bike can be stolen.

Easily one of the biggest targets for thieves is laptops. Think about it — you’re holding a one-thousand dollar piece of technology designed to be portable. For thieves, stealing a laptop isn’t too hard, and few people will even notice. During my freshman year, my friend’s car was broken into and his computer was stolen. One student even broke into an on-campus apartment to steal computers.

So how can you protect your valuable laptop from theft?

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What size dorm room should I live in for college?

My hard work paid off, I got my certificate and SAT and I will be leaving for college next year, if you are like me you’ll probably be filling out a housing application soon. In an application, you may have a choice about what size dorm room you’d like to live in, where you specify if you want a single, double, triple, or a quad.
Deciding your ideal room size may be a bit tough, especially if you’ve never really lived on your own before. Both small and large rooms have their advantages and disadvantages.

How to decide what room

Consider what type of person you are — are you introverted and do you like your own space? Then a single will be more for you. If you’re outgoing and want to have a lot of fun, then a triple or a quad will be more of your style.
Doubles typically offer a strong balance between the two — through your roommate, you can expand, but you can usually still find your privacy too.
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What to do after your parents leave on move-in day

I think the reality of living away from home really sinks in when your parents leave for home on move-in day.

I remember mine: we had just enjoyed a nice dinner at Chili’s, and it was just starting to get dark. I gave my mom a second hug, shook my dad’s hand, and they got in the car and drove off. I walked back up the stairs to my dorm, and as I looked at the buildings on either side, I realized it: I’m on my own. This was both a cool and unnerving thought.

Once your parents leave, you’re going to be on your own too. You might feel lonely, homesick, and nervous. How you choose to spend your first night is up to you, and you should do what you feel most comfortable doing, but here are some things I recommend: Read more…


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